Thursday, December 6, 2012

Final Thoughts


Having never taken a drawing class, I did not know what to expect when I walked in. I could never really draw very well, or make anything look life-like. We started with learning types of lines, and how to make lines look crisp with a ruler instead of free-handing. Then we started learning perspective, which was very nice, I knew nothing of one-point or two-point. It helped me get my angles right, and I needed to work on it a lot. When we began contours, I really enjoyed those but I feel like we should not have done so many self-portrait blind contours. People have varying views of themselves, and sometimes it's more difficult to draw yourself, mentally. But I loved using the different mediums for contour work, especially the ink and brush. After contour, we began a technique called loose to tight, which is blocking in subject matter with free hand, no ruler. I liked this a lot more, because using rulers for everything gets tedious when you can just draw it out in layers and keep fixing the shape that way. Then we went over the drawn graphite lines in conte and tightened them up with that medium. I learned how to look and see how light wraps itself around its subjects, and tell where shadows are and how to use implied line to show shadows. After the loose to tight freehand, we began with crosshatching. Crosshatching is amazing to me, because it shows just how much you can do with a straight line. You can have so much variation, and make it look like an object has shadows and shape with just lines. Overall, drawing was my most challenging, demanding, and time-consuming class. But it's alright, because I really enjoyed it, and I loved doing the work and learning the techniques and mediums. 

Crosshatching




Tuesday, November 6, 2012

Urban Sketching


Urban sketching is a loose to tight technique. You start by drawing a landscape with pencil and no ruler, then gradually get lines more and more straight with layers. Then you watercolour over for a nice effect on accents, and put strong straight pen lines over bold lines that need to be highlighted. You're trying to get a feel for the environment, not to be 100% accurate.